Inside the Studio, The Woven Tale Press

Inside the Studio: Andrea Rae

As she enters her home-based studio in West Lafayette, Indiana, fiber artist Andrea Rae is reminded of a dark side of human existence. Hanging on the door is a pocket from a pair of jeans worn by a former prostitute. On the pocket, the word “Tips” is written in red ink. “For me, this woven piece of fabric is a daily reminder of human trafficking, child pornography, and the many tragedies that still occur in every state and country.”

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Artist Q&A, The Woven Tale Press

Q&A with Sandrine Hermand-Grisel

Photographer Sandrine Hermand-Grisel grew up in Paris and London before relocating to the United States. She studied international law, then in 1997 decided to dedicate herself full-time to photography. Influenced by her late mother’s sculptures and her husband’s paintings and films, she worked on several projects before her series Nocturnes was recognized in 2005 by Harry Gruyaert, Bertrand Despres, and John Batho for the Prix Kodak de la Critique Photographique. In 2006, she moved with her family to the United States and began experimenting with landscape photography with her series Somewhere and On the Road.

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Artist Q&A, The Woven Tale Press

Q&A with Naomi Schlinke

Naomi Schlinke is a Texas-based artist, whose work has been exhibited at the Robert McClain Gallery in Houston, The Dallas Contemporary, Texas State University in San Marcos, D. M. Allison Gallery in Houston, Women and Their Work, D Berman Gallery, and the Dougherty Art Center, all in Austin. Before moving to Austin from San Francisco in 1994, she exhibited with the Braunstein-Quay Gallery in San Francisco. In the 1970s and early ’80s, Schlinke danced with the Margaret Jenkins Dance Company and the Joe Goode Performance Group, both based in San Francisco. Much of her approach to painting is founded on her experiences as a dancer. She earned a BA and MA in Dance from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She grew up in Dallas, Texas.

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Inside the Studio, The Woven Tale Press

Inside the Studio: Dorothea Osborne

Painter Dorothea Osborn draws inspiration from her home-based studio. She loves its location on the Normanskill Creek in Delmar, New York, and its lightness due to a large window and glass door. She places her grandmother’s rocking chair and a table near the window to sketch, read, and work on the computer. When the weather is nice, she works on the deck or in the yard.

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Inside the Studio, The Woven Tale Press

Inside the Studio: David Criner

For David Criner, a basement studio has become his sanctuary. There, in his Chicago home, his best emotional and spiritual selves manifest. In fact, thirteen years ago, he wanted to buy the house because of its basement. The basement is spacious—unlike earlier studios housed in small apartments and even a storage locker—and easily accessible. No longer does he want to share a studio with other artists as he did as a student; he requires privacy to create his art.

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Inside the Studio, The Woven Tale Press

Inside the Studio: Emily Rangel-Cascio

At Northern Illinois University, ceramic artist Emily M. Rangel-Cascio turned a windowless, plain studio into a home. The graduate student decorated metal shelves and walls with her artwork—both completed projects, such as a mug collection, and failed ones that she intends to revisit. Through viewing these displays, visitors, professors and fellow classmates gain insight into her creative process, including different clays and firing techniques she uses. The walls also provide privacy so she can concentrate on her work.

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Artist Q&A, The Woven Tale Press

Q&A with David Quinn

David Quinn is a self-taught photographer in Setauket, New York, who became interested in photography in his early fifties. He focuses mainly on creating landscape, flower, and nature images with an occasional venture into street and architectural pictures. In his artwork, he strives to evoke an emotion, raise an uncertainty, or create a sense of movement by either isolating key elements or blurring the subject matter. He has had exhibits at the Long Island Arts Council at Freeport and Huntington Arts Council. In 2014, the online magazine BWGallerist identified him as one of the best emerging black-and-white fine art photographers. See his work in WTP Vol. VI #6.

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