Artist Q&A, The Woven Tale Press

Q&A with Cher Pruys

Cher Pruys is a self-taught, hyperrealist Canadian artist living in Devlin, Ontario. By age three, she was seldom found without a drawing tool in hand. Over the years, she worked in pencil, charcoal and ink, until, at the age of thirty-five, she picked up a paintbrush and began painting with oil paints. Later, she found her chosen mediums in acrylic, watercolor and gouache.

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Artist Q&A, The Woven Tale Press

Q&A with Jaynie Crimmins

Jaynie Crimmins, a New York City-based artist, creates alternative narratives from quotidian materials. Her work has been shown at Art on Paper, New York City and exhibited at the Sharjah Museum of Art in the United Arab Emirates; SPRING/BREAK Art Show, New York; Governor’s Island Art Fair, New York; the National Museum of Romanian Literature in Bucharest; the Hunterdon Art Museum, New Jersey; and many other museums.

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Artist Q&A

Q&A with Amy Ragus

Amy Ragus is a photocollage/mixed media artist who considers herself a painter who uses photo fragments as brushstrokes on a larger field. Her work in photocollage has been exhibited in one-person and group exhibits in the US and abroad. She was a founding partner of Fine Arts Express, Inc. and an assistant professor of Art at Regis College. She is a three-time MacDowell Fellow and has been an artist-in-residence at Gros Morne National Park in Newfoundland, Yosemite National Park in California, the Sitka Center for Art & Ecology in Oregon, the Virginia Center for the Arts, and others. She earned an MFA in painting from Columbia University and a BA in studio art from Wellesley College. Ragus, who was born in New York City, now lives in a small farmhouse in the woods near Walpole, Mass. Her work appears in WTP Vol. VIII #9

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Inside the Studio, The Woven Tale Press

Inside the Studio: Susan Tabachnick

For the past eleven years, mixed-media artist Susan Tabachnick has worked out of her historic home in Bridgeport, Connecticut. In the 1909 house, she can create and store artwork in her dining room, guest room, living room, front room, and third-floor studio. The 2 ½-story building, in an historic district, boasts large windows, high ceilings and great natural light. “My house has wonderful karma, and it embraces me daily,” says Tabachnick. “In reality, though, my work has taken over the house.”

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Inside the Studio

Inside the Studio: Sophia Ruppert

Seven months ago, Sophia Ruppert moved her studio from the University of Nebraska, where she teaches, to a warehouse in an industrial part of Lincoln, with a high ceiling that opens up to industrial beams, ductwork, and pipes. Ruppert shares the space with a painter. “Splitting the place between a 2-D and 3-D artist is surprisingly easy as we both have different spatial needs,” says Ruppert. Her warehouse studio space is long and narrow, so her work has become smaller than work done at the university studio where she could utilize large portions of walls, floor, and physical space. “My previous studio was very pristine and, being at a university, I had limitations to how I could work within it. At my current studio, I can build walls or paint the room an entirely different color if I need to.”

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