Inside the Studio, The Woven Tale Press

Inside the Studio: Emily Rangel-Cascio

At Northern Illinois University, ceramic artist Emily M. Rangel-Cascio turned a windowless, plain studio into a home. The graduate student decorated metal shelves and walls with her artwork—both completed projects, such as a mug collection, and failed ones that she intends to revisit. Through viewing these displays, visitors, professors and fellow classmates gain insight into her creative process, including different clays and firing techniques she uses. The walls also provide privacy so she can concentrate on her work.

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Inside the Studio, The Woven Tale Press

Inside the Studio: Renae Barnard

Renae Barnard is recognized by the United States Green Building Council (USGBC) as a Leadership in Energy Accredited Professional (LEED AP) and by the International Institute for Bau-biologie® & Ecology as a Building Biologie Practitioner. She has recently completed projects in cooperation with the National Immigration Law Center and the City of Santa Monica Department of Cultural Affairs. She is a recipient of the Sue Arlen Walker and Harvey M. Parker Memorial Fellowship, the Armory Center for the Arts Teaching Artist Fellowship, The Ahmanson Annual Fellowship, Lincoln Fellowship Award, and Christopher Street West Art and Culture Grant.

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Inside the Studio, The Woven Tale Press

Inside the Studio: Josie Bell

Fifteen years ago, Josie Bell converted the basement in her Utah home to a studio. At the time, she was raising her two-year-old son in Orem and attending art school. She felt fortunate to have a space to devote to her passion, which is creating art—even if the basement studio is cold in winter. She loves how she’s surrounded by nature, including walls of silent canyons, mountains, and stone formations. The sunset over a nearby frozen lake moves her. “It is magical to be able to stare at it, walk around it, smell and feel it,” says Bell, who’s originally from Brazil. “Leaving the tropics and embracing the winter’s heavy snow and hot summers of the desert works as a meditation for the inner.”

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