Inside the Studio, The Woven Tale Press

Inside the Studio: David Criner

For David Criner, a basement studio has become his sanctuary. There, in his Chicago home, his best emotional and spiritual selves manifest. In fact, thirteen years ago, he wanted to buy the house because of its basement. The basement is spacious—unlike earlier studios housed in small apartments and even a storage locker—and easily accessible. No longer does he want to share a studio with other artists as he did as a student; he requires privacy to create his art.

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Inside the Studio, The Woven Tale Press

Inside the Studio: Emily Rangel-Cascio

At Northern Illinois University, ceramic artist Emily M. Rangel-Cascio turned a windowless, plain studio into a home. The graduate student decorated metal shelves and walls with her artwork—both completed projects, such as a mug collection, and failed ones that she intends to revisit. Through viewing these displays, visitors, professors and fellow classmates gain insight into her creative process, including different clays and firing techniques she uses. The walls also provide privacy so she can concentrate on her work.

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Inside the Studio, The Woven Tale Press

Inside the Studio: Renae Barnard

Renae Barnard is recognized by the United States Green Building Council (USGBC) as a Leadership in Energy Accredited Professional (LEED AP) and by the International Institute for Bau-biologie® & Ecology as a Building Biologie Practitioner. She has recently completed projects in cooperation with the National Immigration Law Center and the City of Santa Monica Department of Cultural Affairs. She is a recipient of the Sue Arlen Walker and Harvey M. Parker Memorial Fellowship, the Armory Center for the Arts Teaching Artist Fellowship, The Ahmanson Annual Fellowship, Lincoln Fellowship Award, and Christopher Street West Art and Culture Grant.

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