Artist Q&A, The Woven Tale Press

Q&A with John Greiner-Ferris

In January 2017, John Greiner-Ferris returned to being a photographer after a ten-year hiatus in theater. That winter, Greiner-Ferris was working on a play at a residency in Vermont when he picked up a camera and resumed where he’d left off. After all, many years earlier he’d worked as a corporate and freelance photographer and writer. In his photography, he’s attracted to the beauty of places and things that others often overlook. Nature is almost always the common element. He lives in the Boston area.  He earned an MFA in Playwriting at Boston University and formed two theater companies. He holds a BFA in Visual Communications and Photography from Ohio University. See his work in WTP Vol. VII #9

 

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Artist Q&A, The Woven Tale Press

Q&A with Eileen Murphy

Eileen Murphy has spent most of her life along the Hudson River, first in Westchester and Columbia Counties, and now in Brooklyn, where she has lived for the past fifteen years. Murphy has shown widely in New York City and in Hudson, NY. She has been awarded residencies to the Vermont Studio Center and Yaddo. She’s also been featured in publications such as Harper’s Magazine. In 2017, she received the Individual Artist Award from the Santo Foundation and was invited by the US Department of State to participate in the Art in the Embassies program. Her work is currently on view at the American Embassy in Algiers, Algeria. She is currently represented by Garvey|Simon in New York City and Carrie Haddad Gallery in Hudson, New York. Murphy holds a Bachelor of Arts degree from Mount Holyoke College and a Masters of Fine Arts from the Pratt Institute.

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Inside the Studio, The Woven Tale Press

Alex Egan: Inside the Studio

No matter what season, artist Alex Egan finds inspiration and comfort in her home-based studio in Norfolk, England. Outside the studio in her brick farmhouse stretches open fields and woodland where sugar beet, barley, and potato crops grow and animals abound. In summer, she spots dragonflies and butterflies, while in the fall she hears stags roaring. Herds of red deer gallop through the marshy water at the bottom of the field, their hooves creating an intoxicating noise. Hares, pheasants, and wading birds roam the area that’s near the Norfolk Broads, a network of navigable rivers and lakes.

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Artist Q&A, The Woven Tale Press

Q&A with Heather Gorham

For the past twenty-five years, Heather Gorham has been painting and making sculpture—for this artist, the one complements the other. The painter and sculptor uses a variety of mediums including acrylic, wood, resin, and bronze. Gorham’s figurative artwork revolves around the tangible interpretation of the everyday in which she creates—with a twist—a dreamy window into common experiences. She is a self-taught painter, who branched out into sculpture, studying the art of bronze casting under artists David Illes and Martin Delabano. Her painting and sculpture have been shown in galleries across the country including Santa Fe, Napa Valley, Los Angeles, and Austin. She is represented by the Craighead-Green Gallery in Dallas and the On Center Gallery in Provincetown, Mass. She lives and works in Dallas with her husband and two shaggy dogs. See her work featured in The Woven Tale Press Vol. VII #8.

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Inside the Studio, The Woven Tale Press

Inside the Studio: Manuel Knapp

Manuel Knapp, a true master of string as fine art, relishes mornings in his third-floor studio in a half-timbered historic building in Grossglattbach, Germany. As he sips his 9 a.m. coffee, he enjoys the quietness of the attic space and witnessing the town slowly awakening—sunlight floats through glass tiles, spotlighting spider webs as he begins his day creating his string sculptures one piece at a time

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Inside the Studio, The Woven Tale Press

Inside the Studio: Maya Kuvaja

Maya Kuvaja loves how she can experience nature from her home-based studio in the Lakes Region of western Maine. Through a single window in a two-hundred-square-foot room, she gazes out on acres of pine and oak forests and visiting animals. The varying light shining through the room influences her artwork. “Bright orange summer afternoons, pale blue winter mornings, deep violet autumn evenings all filter in and inform the atmosphere and mood of my work,” says Kuvaja. “My studio feels like a part of my natural surroundings. It is a space where I am lost in abstract thoughts and tuned in to nature.”

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